15 Best Off Road Trails Los Angeles: California

Orange SUV Muddy Terrain Off-Road

Los Angeles is home to a wide range of nearby trails that will challenge any off-roader looking for a new adventure. California’s geography offers a diverse mix of verdant forests, beautiful beaches, large mountain ranges, and vast deserts. Although not in the city itself, there are many fantastic off-road trails near Los Angeles to explore.

Head to Holcomb Creek OHV for a challenge, where you will encounter rocky and rough terrain. For a moderate ride, Lake Hughes Truck Trail is a top choice with beautiful views. There are many more, such as Rattlesnake Canyon, Del Sur Ridge, and Rowher OHV Trail.

Here are 15 of the best off road trails near Los Angeles:

  1. Holcomb Creek OHV
  2. Pioneertown to Big Bear OHV Route
  3. Lake Hughes Truck Trail
  4. Rattlesnake Canyon RC3331 – Johnson Valley
  5. Del Sur Ridge
  6. Berdoo Canyon
  7. Rowher OHV Trail
  8. Brooklyn Mine OHV Trail
  9. Sierra Pelona OHV Road
  10. Gold Fever OHV Trail
  11. Gold Mountain Trail
  12. Hungry Valley SVRA – Pronghorn Trail
  13. Liebre Mountain
  14. Miller Jeep Trail – San Pedro
  15. Hungry Valley SVRA – Homestead Trail

15 Best Off Road Trails Los Angeles

1. Holcomb Creek OHV

Holcomb Creek OHV is great for any off-road vehicle. It’s a difficult 8-mile long boulder field that even the most experienced off-roaders find challenging.

The water crossings in this route have levels that rise during flash floods, and in winter, the snow can pile up to 5 feet deep. Make sure to monitor these conditions before taking a trip here.

2. Pioneertown to Big Bear OHV Route

This route is one of the well-known nature spots around Big Bear City. It’s around 19 miles long with great views of yucca trees.

There’s also little traffic around the area, so the bumpier and harder-to-drive spots are open to any off-roaders who want to step up their game. Other OHV routes intersect with this trail, making it a great place to explore other off-road activities.

3. Lake Hughes Truck Trail

The Lake Hughes Truck Trail is one of the easier routes on this list. It’s 19 miles long, and many are surprised to find that it’s mostly a quiet dirt road. All OHVs are allowed, and you can get a good view of the lake as well.

Certain parts near the cliffs’ edge will require some elevation for your transportation to carry you uphill around its narrower parts. Also, don’t expect any campgrounds along this route, so be prepared.

4. Rattlesnake Canyon RC3331 – Johnson Valley

This trail is open only between March and November. The 27.5 mile-long road is sandy with a few uneven spots. It’s those areas that make this simple route slightly more difficult.

Located near Landers, California, Rattlesnake Canyon is also known to be a venue for nature trips, so be ready for some wild encounters, usually with the cows that graze nearby.

Rattlesnake Canyon California Off-Road Jeeps

5. Del Sur Ridge

A shorter trail at 7 miles long, the Del Sur Ridge is suitable for beginners and allows any OHV. It’s a dirt road that’s hard and compact but is littered with leftover ruts from previous off-roading due to water erosion.

While traveling along this road, you may also see some wildflowers along the way. Though considered an easy trail, you can up the challenge by going for the more offshoot routes.

6. Berdoo Canyon

The Berdoo Canyon Trail is known to have quite the history and is the site of the Berdoo Camp, also known as a ghost town. Set in a desert plain, the trail stretches to about 24 miles and is narrow enough that trucks may find it hard to pass through. Also, you’ll need some clearance to see if your OHV is suitable for the craggy road.

These qualities make it a top choice on your LA off-roading list, but you’ll have to pay a fee to enter the Joshua Tree National Park where it’s located. The cost varies, depending on your vehicle, and you can also get the park’s annual pass if you’ll be making several trips. Furthermore, the route ends around the Berdoo Canyon shooting area so take care not to drive in the middle of the range.

7. Rowher OHV Trail

This 14-mile stretch suits all types of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs). It’s a one-hour drive from LA that features sandy, steep hills but with a solid rock foundation. It’s better to try out this trail when the weather isn’t rainy to avoid dangerous slips.

The area is also home to a Tataviam Indian Village and a World War II landing site. These areas are closed off to preserve cultural heritage. Just follow the designated routes marked by forest management, and you won’t need to worry about accidentally going off-route.

At the end of the trail, a beautiful view overlooking the reservoir awaits you. You can also rest in the campsites, which have clean bathrooms and unloading ramps. These features are what made this trail popular among off-roaders ever since the 60s.

8. Brooklyn Mine OHV Trail

For this 10-mile trail, don’t be fooled by the easy dirt road at the beginning. It becomes more complex towards the end, which makes the Brooklyn Mine OHV for moderately experienced off-roaders.

This trail is also within Joshua Tree National Park, so expect an entrance fee. Wildflowers are known to dot the surroundings, and as for any campsites, you’ll find them spread across the trail.

Brooklyn Mine OHV Trail

9. Sierra Pelona OHV Road

This trail is located near Santa Clarita, California, and boasts a scenic, riverside view with plenty of wildflowers. You might also encounter some wildlife while crossing the 17-mile route. It’s a relatively easy trail that begins with rocky terrain, but it gets easier the further you go.

However, remember to keep your guard up and watch out for some tricky spots. The trail is also partially closed. Several OHV enthusiasts recommend the 6N08 and consider it as the way to go so that you can exit to the highway.

10. Gold Fever OHV Trail

The Gold Fever trail is another beginner-level route, but clearance is required due to the rocky terrain. Depending on the weather, you may also encounter mud holes on the dirt road while the winter season is known to make this route more challenging than usual.

The surrounding area is wooded, teeming with the wildlife near Big Bear City. You’ll need to walk to get to those beautiful views, though.

11. Gold Mountain Trail

Also set with Big Bear Lake as a backdrop, this 12-mile trail is considered one of the trickier routes. The resorts around Big Bear contributed to the trail’s popularity. You’ll battle with rocks, mud, and water, not to mention that the route experiences some heavy traffic.

It’s best to visit from March to October. Enthusiasts also classify it as moderate to difficult due to elevated areas and one notable V- rock drop in the middle of the route. The easier-to-reach areas are also where you can find great places to take photos.

12. Hungry Valley SVRA – Pronghorn Trail

The Hungry Valley road is a known State Vehicular Recreation Area (SVRA) since it branches off to several off-road routes. One of them is the 5.7-mile Pronghorn Trail that consists of steep inclines and sudden twists and turns.

This trail’s main feature is an intimidating rock obstacle that’s not for the faint of heart. It’s not a requirement to pass through it, though, so only take the risk if you’re cleared and prepared.

13. Liebre Mountain

The Golden Eagle Trail at Liebre Mountain is a challenging route that’s best experienced between April and December. This is so that you can have the opportunity to explore the area’s winding trail and great views. It’s around 21 miles long, starting at Quail Lake, California, and ending at Lake Hughes Road.

The first part of the route was originally part of the Old Ridge route paved with concrete. It’s currently uneven and full of holes, but it has a dirt path perfect for off-roading. This takes you up to Sandberg Mountain that’s filled with oak trees.

There are also many sidetracks to go down from, all of which end at viewpoints or sparsely-furnished campgrounds. If you want a more well-equipped campsite, head to the Bear and Sawmill national forest campgrounds, but you will need a forest pass to enter them.

14. Miller Jeep Trail – San Pedro

You might get confused with what to call it since the older Miller Jeep Trail is extended by the addition of the Lockwood Creek route. Here, it’s better to bring an OHV with a higher elevation for the mountainous terrain that you will be facing.

It’s an exciting route with beautiful scenery. However, some off-roaders warn that it’s better to start early so you won’t end up navigating the long, 21-mile road until evening.

15. Hungry Valley SVRA – Homestead Trail

The shortest trail on the list, with only 1.3 miles to its name, the Homestead trail makes up for the length with varied activities and routes for ATVs, motorbikes, and 4x4s. The 19,000-acre park is also littered with many campsites to accommodate off-roaders.

Conclusion – 15 Best Off Road Trails Los Angeles

For a short recap, here are the top 15 trails to visit around Los Angeles:

  1. Holcomb Creek OHV
  2. Pioneertown to Big Bear OHV Route
  3. Lake Hughes Truck Trail
  4. Rattlesnake Canyon RC3331 – Johnson Valley
  5. Del Sur Ridge
  6. Berdoo Canyon
  7. Rowher OHV Trail
  8. Brooklyn Mine OHV Trail
  9. Sierra Pelona OHV Road
  10. Gold Fever OHV Trail
  11. Gold Mountain Trail
  12. Hungry Valley SVRA – Pronghorn Trail
  13. Liebre Mountain
  14. Miller Jeep Trail – San Pedro
  15. Hungry Valley SVRA – Homestead Trail

Most of the trails can be found around nature parks, making them a haven for off-roaders around LA. However, it’s also advisable that going a bit farther is always worth a change in scenery, such as those trails situated around San Bernardino.

Research before heading out in case of sudden closures, and remember to keep tabs on the weather and the fire danger level during your off-roading trip. Be responsible in your preparation and allow yourself to enjoy the trails to the fullest.

Kris Peter

Adventure seeker and off-road enthusiast. I love the thrill of going off-road and taking on the elements.

Recent Posts